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The “Vulva Spaceship”: 
a symbol for more equality in the entire universe.

We feel very blessed that our special spaceship concept has received so much attention: 250 Million media impressions, headlines in 110 countries, half a billion people impacted. Thank you very much for the many articles, interviews, radio reports, social media posts and comments. Our “Vulva Spaceship” even made it to the Late Night Show of Stephen Colbert and was nominated for the Cannes Lion 2022 in the category “Glass: The Lion for Change”.

After the launch of our “Vulva Spaceship” and all the media reports we received a lot of feedback and a number of requests: An article in a book, an invitation to the Summer Space Festival in Belgium and a lot of mails of man who explained us how to improve the “Vulva Spaceship”. The Australian News called it “Lefty Lunacy”. But above all, we created many question marks!

Art can and should create question marks! For 10 years I have loved combining activism and art. I prefer to spread new concepts than already existing ones. I love thinking outside the box. If we don't we are just robots, right? It's time for more diversity in the entire universe. Let's start with small steps in our imagination and end with taking giant leaps in real life.

My vision is a society full of art and new ideas. I want that even more people develop an awareness for gender equality and that we all work together to break down discriminatory structures. What's your vision for the future?

Hugs and Kisses from the other side of the universe 😘❤💫

Yours Jasmin, Activist and Artist | Founder of “WHAT IS FEMINISM today?”

Let’s dream big.
Imagine there are equal opportunities. Everywhere.

Have you ever noticed? In space travel all the problems that we have on earth are amplified. For example, in the coveted position of space traveler, only 12% were female so far. It's time for equal opportunities in the entire universe!

That's why we developed the “Vulva Spaceship”. We want to inspire people to think about socially relevant topics. Our societies still have a lot of gender related issues in daily life, in politics, in economics, in education and health. We should use our ressources and energy for the greater good and make earth and even space more equal places.

We believe that equality even has a place in space.
It’s time for new symbols in the universe.

Like earth, space is struggling with gender equality. We believe: space is for everyone! It's the year 2022. We think that it's time for humankind to take the next giant leap. We would like to join forces with you to look to the future. How looks space traveling in the future? Who is involved?
With our project “WBF Aeronautics” we want to inspire space travel to be open to modern forms and to realize equal opportunities across the entire universe.

Thanks to everyone who took part in our project and signed our petition. We are grateful for all your signatures that we collected on our mission to create the “Vulva Spaceship”.

The “Vulva Spaceship”

© Draft of the “Vulva Spaceship”

We wish that even more people develop more awareness of gender equality and that we all work together to eliminate discriminatory structures.

Our vision is that one day gender discrimination will no longer be an issue on this planet. We firmly believe that by joining forces we can create a more just world. Every person can contribute to this in their sphere of activity. Because there is still gender-based discrimination in almost every area of ​​life and work. On earth. And even in space.

As activist and artists we like to think visionary and therefore want to inspire space travel with the “WBF Aeronautics” project and set an example for gender equality. It's time for new symbols in the universe. That is why we have developed the “Vulva Spaceship”.

The "Vulva Spaceship"

© Draft of the “Vulva Spaceship”

The first spacecraft in a V-shape is not only a symbol for more diversity in space, but also state-of-the-art and thus more sustainable. The “Vulva Spaceship” designed by “WBF Aeronautics” represents inclusivity, varying from traditional shapes. Thus, the project adds another dimension to the representation of humanity in space and is communicating to the world that anyone has a place in the universe, regardless of physical characteristics.

Dr. Lucia Hartmann, Head of “WBF Aeronautics” and inventor of the “Vulva Spaceship” reports from her research: “The spaceship’s shape is surprisingly aerodynamic, creating way less drag when the vehicle punches through the Earth’s atmosphere. Due to this optimized V-shape, it guarantees maximum fuel efficiency with an exterior made of reinforced carbon which enables it to withstand the most extreme temperatures.” “WBF Aeronautics” wants to inspire space travel to be open to modern forms and to realize equal opportunities across the universe.

The Project “WBF Aeronautics”

“WBF Aeronautics” is a collaboration between Dr. Lucia Hartmann and her team and “Wer braucht Feminismus?” (WBF). Dr. Lucia Hartmann started her research work about spaceships and discovered that a spaceship varying from traditional shapes, would be more aerodynamic and create less drag, thus being more sustainable.

She reached out to us for the purpose of a collaboration and for us to do the media work as there is much more to it than just the scientific aspect. On the one hand, the topic is sensitive, but on the other hand, it also holds great opportunities. The symbol of a Spaceship in a V-shape represents more diversity in space. The project adds another dimension to the representation of humanity in space. 

We believe that equality even has a place in space. It's time for new symbols in the universe. 

Dr. Lucia Hartmann
We dare to change the status quo in space travel: New shapes in space will revolutionize our thinking, our actions and everything we have thought to be true.
My team and I are currently working flat out to present the design of the first prototype of the spacecraft to the public. We aim to present the model from March 8th 2023.

Dr. Lucia Hartmann, Head of “WBF Aeronautics” and Inventor of the “Vulva Spaceship”

Jasmin Mittag (Activist and Artist)
Space is for everyone! With our mission, we prove to the world that gender equality even has a place in space. We are not only inspiring space travel, but we’re also rewriting the gender narrative.

Jasmin Mittag, Activist and Artist | Founder of “Wer braucht Feminismus?” and “WHAT IS FEMINISM today?” | Campaign Manager of “WBF Aeronautics”

Women in Space

Have you ever noticed? In space travel all the gender-related problems that we have on earth are amplified. For example, in the coveted position of space traveler, only round about 12% were female so far. It's time for equal opportunities in the entire universe!

The criteria for determining who has achieved human spaceflight vary. We use the criteria of the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale, which defines spaceflight as any flight over 100 kilometers (62 miles). According to this, 596 people have been in space so far since the first human spaceflight in 1961. Until February 2022, of the 596 total space travelers 72 have been women. This means that of the space travelers to date, only 12% are female.

The female space travelers have been one each from France, Italy, South Korea, and the United Kingdom; two each from Canada, China, and Japan; five from the Soviet Union/Russia; and 57 from the United States. 

Here are quotes of a few from them:

Dr. Valentina Tereshkova was the first woman in space, she is the only woman to have been on a solo space mission so far and in addition, she is known for being the youngest woman in space. She was born in 1937 and was only 26 years old on her mission. 

Dr. Sally Ride was selected to be an astronaut as part of NASA Astronaut Group 8, in 1978, the first class to select women. In 1983 Dr. Sally Ride became the first US-American woman in space as a crew member on Space Shuttle Challenger. 

Eileen Collins was the first female commander of a US american Spaceship. She commanded STS-114 where she became the first astronaut to fly the Spaceship through a complete 360-degree pitch maneuver. 

Dr. Mae Jemison was a doctor, engineer and NASA astronaut. She received her first mission on September 28, 1989 when she was selected to join the STS-47 crew as a Mission Specialist. She was the first Black woman in space and had to face rejection and racism.

Curious to learn more? Stay tuned!

Inventions in space travel, as well as perspectives on gender equality, progress in small steps and, if we are lucky, sometimes in large leaps. There are new findings almost every day that flow into the latest developments. We hope that we can continue to inspire humanity with our projects in the future.

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Vulva Spaceship